How do I self-publish for authentication and allow Constant Contact to send on behalf of my company domain?



Configure your Constant Contact account to be DMARC aligned

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How do I self-publish for authentication and allow Constant Contact to send on behalf of my company domain?

In order to be in alignment with DMARC, you must self-publish for authentication. Email authentication is just a way for an Internet Service Provider (ISP) to verify that an email is from who it says it's from, and if it doesn't pass it's tests, what should happen to the email. Self-publishing for authentication is when a customer chooses to publish email authentication information in their own domain's Domain Name Service (DNS) for DKIM, SPF, or both. This article will tell you how.

Warning: Once your Constant Contact account has been set to self-publish for authentication, don't send an email campaign until your DNS record has been updated. If you do, your campaign will fail. You can only use an email address within your authenticated domain as the 'from' address. If you use a different address, your message will fail. You can only use an email address within your authenticated domain as the 'from' address. If you use a different domain, your messages will bounce.


In order to be able to self publish for authentication, an organization must:
  • Own its own domain name
  • Use a web hosting provider who supports authentication record publication
  • Have a valid email address within that domain to use as the From address in their Constant Contact account. 
If you have a web administrator or an IT department, get them involved with this. If your web host cannot update your DNS record for you, and you're not comfortable working with your web page's code, you might want to consider having Constant Contact authenticate your email instead.
 

Set Up Self-Publishing for Authentication

  1. Contact Customer Support and tell them you want to self-publish for authentication.
    • Tell them what domain you will be publishing your authentication records in.
    • Your authentication keys for publishing will be generated and emailed to you (typically within 1-2 days)
    • As will the syntax for the name of the TXT record that also needs to be generated.
  2. Contact your domain administrator, hosting provider, ISP or Constant Contact reseller about creating authentication records in your domain's DNS entry.
    • For DKIM, use the information emailed to you in Step 1 to create a DNS TXT record. They should use the first part of the generated output (the part before the ':') as the name of the TXT record, and the second part (part after the ':') as the content of the txt record.
    • For Sender ID, set up a specially formatted TXT record in your DNS information called an SPF record. If you already have an SPF or SPF2 record, you must include Constant Contact's server information. To do this, add the following to your existing SPF record:
      include:spf.constantcontact.com
      If you don't have an SPF or SPF2 record, there is no requirement to create one. No major ISPs use this method any more. If you already have a record published, Constant Contact's information should be included in it.
  3. Change the email you send from to your domain based email in My Settings if you were not already using it.
 

Publish Authentication Records

Once your Constant Contact account is set to self-publishing for authentication, email from that account will fail authentication until your authentication records are published in your domain's DNS entry. Don't delay in contacting your domain host (or IT department) to get your records published. Don't plan a large email campaign before the self-publishing for authentication process is complete.

It may take anywhere from a couple of hours to a couple of days for the newly published authentication records to propagate through the internet, so if your initial test fails due to no signature, wait and try again later.

Once you set up self-publishing for authentication you can only use a 'from' address within your chosen domain or your email will fail checks at the major ISPs and will likely bounce.


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